SteamPower.com
   




Welcome to our steam power educational site for Kids of all ages. With a focus on fun, this page provides some real live small steam power toys and projects that excite, inspire, and educate. Below the Steam Toys are steam power educational and historical sites geared to younger or novice steam power enthusiasts. Last, but by no means least, are links to sites and publications that draw attention to the environmental and cultural benefits that steam power offers for our planet.



Crabfu.com
Cedesign.net
Ministeam.com
Newenergyshop.com
Steamreplicas.co.uk



Additional educational Steam Power Links for Kids:

  • Kids.Net.Au Encyclopedia - Steam Power
  • Steam Engine Facts for Kids
  • THE STEAM POWER CYCLE, a brief overview

  • Benefits of Steam Power
    Steam engines are heat engines. They convert heat into useful work or electricity. Steam engines can be very tiny, or very big. They can drive boats or cars or trucks or trains, or even skate boards.

    The great thing about steam engines is that they don’t have to get their heat from gasoline, or coal, or oil, or natural gas, or thermonuclear reactions, even though that’s what they have been doing for a long long time. Steam engines today are super clean and can get their heat from lots of sources, including heat from the sun, heat from within the earth, heat from leaves and dead plants, heat from hydrogen, and heat from waste, like trash, cooking grease, - even human waste (poop).

    Here's a video of a steam power plant that is making energy, producing clean water, and other useful materials from poop. Watch this video to see how poop becomes power:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tdlqjGlN3A

    As for solar power, steam power plants fueled by the heat from the sun can be large or small, and they can even store the heat so that the power can be generated all night long.

    These solar thermal power plants are a totally clean energy source, even in areas where there is no electrical grid. The stored heat can also be used for directly warming homes or schools in rural areas.





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